Archive for the ‘fight leagues’ Category


Open Directory – Sports: Martial Arts.


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According to the The Sports Business Journal, Cablevision is going to launch a 24 hour mixed martial arts television network in the New York area on May 24th. MMAPayout has the story:

Cablevision’s sports and entertainment tier is currently in 100,000-130,000 homes. The channel will only be offered on Cablevision for its New York audience. A bit of irony considering the ban on MMA in the state.

A description of Fight Now! from the National Cable and Telecommunications Association web site:

Fight Now!, America’s first 24 hour television channel dedicated to giving viewers a front row seat, seven days a week to experience the very best in boxing, wrestling/grappling, mixed martial arts and other combatant styles; along with top notch “fight theme” movies, documentaries and wrap around news coverage makes Fight Now! the untimate TV destination for fight fans.

The Sports Business Journal (subscription required) states that Randy Couture is a minority owner in the channel. The channel does not have a deal with the UFC although Couture is quoted as being hopeful of developing a relationship with the UFC.

The Sports Business Journal has more information regarding the new channel, quoted via the MMAPayout article, stating that it will also offer boxing and wrestling alongside its primary product of mixed martial arts action. Channel Zero is behind the channel’s conception, a Canadian broadcaster that also helped create The Fight Network.

Obviously, the reach of this network, which as MMAPayout writer Jason Cruz points out is ironic due to New York’s ban on MMA, is very small and limited. It will more than likely have no impact on the overall landscape of the sport without added subscriptions. The article quotes the number as being specific to that “tier” of programming, so I’m assuming it runs parallel with what a sports package would be on other carriers. If that’s the case, Cablevision’s actual reach is much larger, and the addition of the channel could cause more subscribers to add the tier.

The more interesting story is that New York hasn’t legalized MMA, yet the amount of mixed martial arts action that New York residents can consume is going to be unrivaled in any part of the United States. Furthermore, Couture hopes to develop a business-oriented relationship with the UFC. While business comes first for Zuffa, I can’t help but wonder if Dana White and company will sell their footage for a cut rate simply to flood the New York market with their product and get more interest in the region.

Cruz opines that this could serve as a litmus test for potential advertisers if the UFC intends to produce their own network in the future. It will be interesting to see what type of advertisers Fight Now! can get, and if the subscription base for Cable vision increases with the addition of the channel. With one of the UFC’s greatest champions as a minority owner, it leads me to believe the UFC isn’t far from influencing the success of the network.About Time


If you are interested in finding out how to get into amateur cage fighting, you will first need to make sure you are up to the challenge. Mixed martial arts (MMA) fighters put in many long hours of training before they try cage fighting. You will need to develop the necessary grappling and striking skills, as well as improve your strength and fitness. Try to take some lessons if you are able, which will greatly accelerate your learning curve. When you think you are ready to get into amateur cage fighting, set up a match with an opponent who also is new to the sport, so you stand a better chance of winning.

To get into amateur cage fighting, you will need:

  • MMA gear
  • MMA lessons
  • Weights or a gym membership
  1. Hit the gym to develop some strength and speed. Work out with weights and run on a treadmill to improve your fitness. The stronger and more fit you are, the more damage you can inflict on your opponent once you get into amateur cage fighting. Building up muscle armor will also help you absorb more punishment from an opponent.
  2. Find an MMA school so you can learn from experienced cage fighters. The membership fee may be expensive, but the knowledge that you will gain will more than pay off when you get into amateur cage fighting. Buy the necessary MMA gear including gloves, headgear and a mouthpiece, then join a beginner’s class and work your way up through the ranks. Watch how the experienced fighters train, and eventually you will start to see your skills improve.
  3. Work out on a heavy bag and speed bag often. Hitting the heavy bag will help you improve your punching power and striking technique. The speed bag improves your hand-eye coordination and hand speed, which will make you more dangerous when you get into amateur cage fighting.
  4. Try a practice cage match. Work with someone from your MMA school and try your hand in the cage. Wear protective gear since you are only sparring. Work on your moves and strikes, and get used to being inside of the cage before you try to get into amateur cage fighting for real.
  5. Ask your MMA instructor if he thinks you are ready for a real match. Once the instructor agrees you are prepared, see if you can set up a match. Train yourself mentally and physically, so when you get into amateur cage fighting against your opponent you will be ready to compete with no excuses.

WILL SANCTIONING ORGANIZATION HELP MMA?

Many say without UFC on board, WAMMA is unnecessary.

Mixed martial arts grow larger everyday with more fighters, promoters and venues emerging like weeds following a winter storm.

With rapid growth come the flood of questions from fans eager to see if Russia’s Fedor Emelianenko can beat Randy Couture? Or if Japan’s Takanori Gomi can out-fight America’s BJ Penn? Some even wonder if Ultimate Fighting Championship has the best fighters in the world?

You might even call it a fine mess.

But one new sanctioning organization called World Alliance of Mixed Martial Arts (WAMMA) claims it can solve all of those questions by overseeing the whole world of MMA.

If UFC allows it.

During a November press conference held in New York City, WAMMA unveiled its plan for a world federation under its firm umbrella that boasts the support of several known MMA fighters, promoters and a former federal government man.

One of the participants is Bill Goldberg, a former pro wrestler and pro football player now giving analysis for Showtime’s EliteXC, who says an organization like WAMMA could refine MMA with “a unified rules system” and other guidelines to allow for the “best to fight the best.”

“Unlike boxing, we want to present a unified system where the No. 1 (ranked fighter) fights No. 2,” Goldberg told the Kristal Hart Show during the press conference held November.

The new organization has established a ratings system for MMA fighters that is compiled and voted by a WAMMA committee comprised of writers and experts of the sport.

Newly elected WAMMA president David Szady, a former FBI investigator, says most of the ingredients for success are intact, except for one crucial element and it’s not sugar.

“Most important is getting the promoters on board,” Szady said. “No. 1 is dialogue and cooperation with UFC.”

It’s not an easy sell.

With UFC raking in money with both fists and last year purchasing Japan’s rival Pride FC, the need for an outside sanctioning organization falls flat.

Based in Las Vegas, UFC is considered the goliath of MMA organizations and the so-called parent of the sport. It also has many of the best athletes under its umbrella. Its parent company, Zuffa LLC, also owns other MMA organizations like World Extreme Cagefighting.

Dana White, the president of UFC, vehemently shakes his head at the idea of a sanctioning organization for MMA.

“Sanctioning organizations are the biggest problems with boxing,” said White, who formerly promoted boxing before changing to MMA. “They’re corrupt.”

He’s not alone.

Kevin Iole, considered one of the top MMA and boxing writers in the country, foresees problems for the sport if sanctioning bodies are picked up.

“All it does is take money out of the fighter’s pockets,” said Iole, who writes for Yahoo! Sports.com. “To me it’s just a money grab.”

Boxing woes

For three decades sanctioning organizations have sprouted up in boxing and have caused problems with ratings, mandatory fight requirements and capricious rulings that usually benefit the organizations monetarily.

“If something like the World Boxing Council came to MMA it wouldn’t mean anything to the fighters,” said Iole, who has covered boxing for two decades. “All the fighters want is just that UFC belt.”

Carlos Arias, an MMA writer for the Orange County Register, agrees with Iole.

“If the UFC doesn’t participate, then who really cares?” asks Arias, who also covers both boxing and MMA. “I think any MMA organization that doesn’t have the UFC and WEC on board is pointless.”

White says WAMMA’s claim that it could lead to better fights are just words.

“We make all the best fights we can make,” said White following a press conference in Las Vegas in early February. “We make the fights the people want to see.”

Those who have experienced the sanctioning woes in boxing do not see any benefit of establishing one in MMA.

“It’s a big problem with boxing,” Iole said of the various sanctioning organizations in boxing.

Gary Shaw, who promotes both professional boxing and MMA, knows both worlds and can see the benefits and pitfalls. But he views WAMMA as something that could help his organization and others.

“I think it’s a good idea, they’re (WAMMA) well-intentioned,” said Shaw, who heads EliteXC, a rival of UFC. “But if one sanctioning organization is successful then what’s to stop others?”

WAMMA’s Szady realizes that other sanctioning organizations may follow but in doing it first and doing it right, he feels the other sanctioning groups that follow will not succeed…….

Cross-promoting

Szady has had conversations with UFC’s parent company Zuffa and has not been able to make it budge in his direction. But talks with other MMA groups like HDNet Fights, M-1, International Fight League and EliteXC have been promising.

Mike Lynch, WAMMA’s COO, says outside of UFC, other MMA organizations are beginning to realize working with each other has benefits.

“There’s already a trail of cross-promotions,” said Lynch, citing an upcoming show that features Strikeforce USA and EliteXC sharing a fight card in California.

But still there are doubters.

“They might start off with good intentions, but inevitably they end up with crooked rankings and ridiculous sanctioning fees,” said Arias of sanctioning organizations.

WAMMA intends to prove otherwise.

“We’re not asking for a sanctioning fee,” said Szady. “All our funds come from our sponsors, not the fighters.”

The sanctioning group uses ad sales from its web site to sustain itself.

“We’re not here to cause fracturing of titles and watering down the sport,” says Lynch. “We truly are a value to MMA.”

Bottom line, says Lynch, it’s about the best fighting the best.

For recent WAMMA rankings and more on the organization go to http://www.gowamma.com

Benefits of -http://nbcsports.msnbc.com


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Cage Fighting - Michigan Cage Fighting - MMA Fighting in Mic

The July 2010 Men’s Independent World MMA Rankings have been released. These rankings are independent of any single MMA media outlet or sanctioning body, and are published on multiple MMA web sites, as well aswww.IndependentWorldMMARankings.com.

Some of the best and most knowledgeable MMA writers from across the MMA media landscape have come together to form an independent voting panel. These voting panel members are, in alphabetical order: Zach Arnold (Fight Opinion); Nicholas Bailey (MMA Ratings); Jared Barnes (Freelance); Jordan Breen (Sherdog); Jim Genia (Full Contact Fighter and MMA Journalist Blog); Jesse Holland (MMA Mania); Robert Joyner (Freelance); Todd Martin (Los Angeles Times and Sherdog); Jim Murphy (The Savage Science); Zac Robinson (Sports by the Numbers MMA); Leland Roling (Bloody Elbow); Michael David Smith (AOL Fanhouse); Joshua Stein (MMA Opinion); Ivan Trembow (Freelance); and Dave Walsh (Head Kick Legend).

Note: Nick Diaz, Jason Miller, and Jake Shields were all recently issued disciplinary suspensions by the Tennessee Athletic Commission for their roles in the post-fight brawl at the Strikeforce event in Nashville. Like all fighters who are serving disciplinary suspensions, these fighters have temporarily lost their eligibility to be ranked, and they will regain their eligibility to be ranked as soon as their disciplinary suspensions have ended. Shields’ three-month disciplinary suspension began on June 9; Miller’s began on June 16; and Diaz’ began on June 23. Gilbert Melendez’ three-month disciplinary suspension has not yet begun, due to the fact that his consent order has not yet been received, so he has not yet lost his eligibility to be ranked.

July 2010 Men’s Independent World MMA Rankings
Ballots collected on July 6, 2010

Heavyweight Rankings (206 to 265 lbs.) 
1. Brock Lesnar (5-1)
2. Fedor Emelianenko (31-2, 1 No Contest)
3. Fabricio Werdum (14-4-1)
4. Cain Velasquez (8-0)
5. Shane Carwin (12-1)
6. Junior dos Santos (11-1)
7. Alistair Overeem (33-11, 1 No Contest)
8. Frank Mir (13-5)
9. Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira (32-6-1, 1 No Contest)
10. Antonio Silva (14-2)

Light Heavyweight Rankings (186 to 205 lbs.) 
1. Mauricio “Shogun” Rua (19-4)
2. Lyoto Machida (16-1)
3. Rashad Evans (15-1-1)
4. Quinton Jackson (30-8)
5. Anderson Silva (25-4)
6. Forrest Griffin (17-6)
7. Muhammed “King Mo” Lawal (7-0)
8. Antonio Rogerio Nogueira (19-3)
9. Gegard Mousasi (28-3-1)
10. Thiago Silva (14-2)

Middleweight Rankings (171 to 185 lbs.) 
1. Anderson Silva (25-4)
2. Chael Sonnen (24-10-1)
3. Nathan Marquardt (29-9-2)
4. Dan Henderson (25-8)
5. Vitor Belfort (19-8)
6. Demian Maia (12-1)
7. Ronaldo “Jacare” Souza (12-2, 1 No Contest)
8. Yushin Okami (24-5)
9. Jorge Santiago (22-8)
10. Robbie Lawler (17-6, 1 No Contest)

Welterweight Rankings (156 to 170 lbs.) 
1. Georges St. Pierre (20-2)
2. Jon Fitch (22-3, 1 No Contest)
3. Thiago Alves (16-6)
4. Josh Koscheck (15-4)
5. Dan Hardy (23-7, 1 No Contest)
6. Martin Kampmann (17-3)
7. Paulo Thiago (13-2)
8. Matt Hughes (44-7)
9. Paul Daley (23-9-2)
10. Matt Serra (11-6)

Lightweight Rankings (146 to 155 lbs.) 
1. Frankie Edgar (12-1)
2. B.J. Penn (15-6-1)
3. Gilbert Melendez (18-2)
4. Kenny Florian (13-4)
5. Eddie Alvarez (20-2)
6. Shinya Aoki (23-5, 1 No Contest)
7. Gray Maynard (9-0, 1 No Contest)
8. Tatsuya Kawajiri (26-5-2)
9. Evan Dunham (11-0)
10. George Sotiropoulos (13-2)

Featherweight Rankings (136 to 145 lbs.) 
1. Jose Aldo (17-1)
2. Manny Gamburyan (11-4)
3. Urijah Faber (23-4)
4. Mike Brown (23-6)
5. Hatsu Hioki (21-4-2)
6. Bibiano Fernandes (8-2)
7. Marlon Sandro (17-1)
8. Josh Grispi (14-1)
9. Michihiro Omigawa (10-8-1)
10. “Lion” Takeshi Inoue (18-4)

Bantamweight Rankings (126 to 135 lbs.) 
1. Dominick Cruz (15-1)
2. Brian Bowles (8-1)
3. Joseph Benavidez (12-1)
4. Miguel Torres (37-3)
5. Scott Jorgensen (10-3)
6. Takeya Mizugaki (13-4-2)
7. Damacio Page (15-4)
8. Wagnney Fabiano (14-2)
9. Masakatsu Ueda (11-1-2)
10. Rani Yahya (15-6)

The Men’s Independent World MMA Rankings are tabulated on a monthly basis in each of the top seven weight classes of MMA, from heavyweight to bantamweight, with fighters receiving ten points for a first-place vote, nine points for a second-place vote, and so on.

The rankings are based purely on the votes of the members of the voting panel, with nobody’s vote counting more than anybody else’s vote, and no computerized voting.

The voters are instructed to vote primarily based on fighters’ actual accomplishments in the cage/ring (the quality of opposition that they’ve actually beaten), not based on a broad, subjective perception of which fighters would theoretically win hypothetical match-ups.

Inactivity: Fighters who have not fought in the past 12 months are not eligible to be ranked, and will regain their eligibility the next time they fight.

Disciplinary Suspensions: Fighters who are currently serving disciplinary suspensions, or who have been denied a license for drug test or disciplinary reasons, are not eligible to be ranked.

Changing Weight Classes: When a fighter announces that he is leaving one weight class in order to fight in another weight class, the fighter is not eligible to be ranked in the new weight class until his first fight in the new weight class has taken place.

Catch Weight Fights: When fights are contested at weights that are in between the limits of the various weight classes, they are considered to be in the higher weight class. The weight limits for each weight class are listed at the top of the rankings for each weight class.

Special thanks to Eric KamanderZach Arnold, and Joshua Stein for their invaluable help with this project, and special thanks to Garrett Bailey for designing our logo.


SUPER HEAVYWEIGHT 266-300+
1. Keith Sterly
2. Dingo
3. Shaun Mirjavadi
4. Leyroy Johnson
5. Eddie Oworoetop
6. Steve King
7. Matt Blaine
8. Estevan Juarez
9. Ryan Spiff
10. Brad Hinderer

HEAVY WEIGHT 265-206
1. Ray Rocheleau
2. Ryan Pokryfky
3. Rob Taylor
4. Donnie Laramie
5. Carnell Giles
6. Shaun Mirjavadi
7. Ed Kramer
8. Jerry Waterson
9. Feliciano Juarez
10. Brian Johnson

LIGHT HEAVY WEIGHT 205-186
1. Shemir Garcia
2. Luke Grummet
3. Ruben Esparza
4. Lee Trombley
5. Adam Trombley
6. Matt Stringham
7. Bryan West
8. John Slayton
9. Morgan Avila
10. Rob Durham

MIDDLE WEIGHT 185-171
1. Muhammad Abdulla
2. Kris Lusch
3. Adam Trombley
4. Andy Carter
5. Jason Favell
6. Brad Morgan
7. Charlie Cosens
8. Marcelo Solinas
9. Gary Conradson
10. Andrew Crushshon

WELTER WEIGHT 170-156
1. Kyle Prepolec
2. Brandon Johnson
3. George Allen
4. Justin Jaynes
5. Drew Morais
6. Billy Garrison
7. Billy Ward
8. Dequan Townsend
9. Korey Kuppe
10. Brandon Noble

LIGHT WEIGHT 155-146
1. Brandon Maddox
2. Drew Morais
3. Chris Franks
4. Mark Christiansen
5. James Carrow
6. John Hubbarth
7. Tim Jenny
8. Rick Morais
9. Hector Garcia
10.Terry VanAvery

FEATHER WEIGHT 145-136
1. Cody Stamann
2. kyle Lingg
3. Mark Walker
4. Chris Moore
5. Ricky Mathis
6.Devon Brown
7. Mario Aguilar
8. Rich Williams
9. Jack Ho
10. Bowe Vincent, Jr

BANTAM WEIGHT 135-126
1. James Gray
2. Joel Chapman
3. Brandon Sturgis
4. Andrew Ventimaglia
5. Ben Sutton
6. Derrick Mandell
7. Dom Sindone
8. Doug Babler
9. Pat Hook
10. Donald Ceri

FLY WEIGHT 125-115
1. Joel Chapman
2. Dean Nasser
3. Dom Sindone
4. Pat Hook
5. Mike Gerraro
6. Michael Cruz
7. Michael Jordan
8. Eddie Tamez
9. Mike Gantner
10.Mikey Galanos

Women’s rankings coming soon!

NOTICE!!! Our State rankings are made from posted results by promotions. Title holders, promotion rankings, Fighter records!
Feel Free to post reasons why your champion or fighter should be on here but first and for most point the finger at yourself for fighting for promotions that do not turn in the fight results to us, fight michigan , full contact fighter, sherdog, mixedmartialarts.com or even post them on their own site. Promotions help the fighters! Fighters tell your promoters to send a simple email to the websites so your record is online, you get your rank, and have an up to date fight record.

THANK YOU.
_________________
THE MIND IS LIKE A PARACHUTTE, IT WORKS BEST WHEN OPEN

These rankings were compliments of the following

The Underground MMA Forum athttp://undergroundmma.messageforums.net/michigan-am-mma-rankings-march-2011_t615.html


Sec. 22(7)

The requirements and standards contained in standards adopted by the New Jersey state athletic control board, N.J.A.C. 13:46-24A and 24B, as they may exist on the effective date of this act, entitled the mixed martial arts unified rules, dated 2000, except for the license fees described in those rules, are incorporated by reference. Any requirements and standards incorporated by reference in this subsection that are in conflict with the requirements and standards of this act are considered superseded by the provisions of this act. The director, in consultation with the commission, may promulgate rules consistent with section 35 to alter, supplement, update, or amend the standards incorporated by reference under this subsection. Any references to the commission in the mixed martial arts unified rules shall mean the department. The standards contained in 13:46-24B.3 are not incorporated by reference. [Note: these relate to payment of inspectors]

MCL 338.3622(7)

§ 13:46-24B.3 Inspectors

All mixed martial arts events shall be subject to the presence, duties and compensation of inspectors as required by 13:46-9.

§ 13:46-24A.12 Stopping a contest

The referee and ringside physician are the sole arbiters of a bout and are the only individuals authorized to enter the fighting area at any time during competition and authorized to stop a contest.

[Note: if this is in conflict with the UCCRA, then the UCCRA takes precedence]

SUBCHAPTER 24B. ADDITIONAL MIXED MARTIAL ARTS RULES

§ 13:46-24B.1 Licensing

(a) All mixed martial arts events shall be subject to the licensing requirements of 13:46-4.

(b) The fee for a mixed martial artist license shall be as set forth in  13:46-4.25(b). Other license fees shall be as set forth in  13:46-4.25(a).

§ 13:46-24B.2 Bond procedure

All mixed martial arts events shall be subject to the bond procedure requirements of  13:46-4.8

§ 13:46-24B.3 Inspectors

All mixed martial arts events shall be subject to the presence, duties and compensation of inspectors as required by 13:46-9.

[note, this rule is not incorporated by reference by express provision of section 22(7) of the MBRA]

§ 13:46-24B.4 Health and safety rules

(a) All mixed martial arts events shall be subject to the uniform medical requirements of 13:46-12A.

SUBCHAPTER 12A. UNIFORM MEDICAL REQUIREMENTS

§ 13:46-12A.1 Applicability

This subchapter shall apply to all professional boxing matches.  All other rules of this chapter shall continue to apply to professional boxing matches except that, in the event of a conflict, the rules of this subchapter shall control.

§ 13:46-12A.2 Pre-licensure medical requirement

(a) A boxer, as a condition to licensure or to the renewal of licensure by the State Athletic Control Board shall undergo a thorough medical examination by a physician or physicians to establish his or her physical and mental fitness for competition.

(b) An examination shall be made no earlier than 30 days but no later than one day prior to licensure or the renewal thereof except for the Hepatitis B and C and HIV tests, referred to in  13:46-12A.3, which shall be conducted no earlier than 180 days prior to participation in each scheduled competition. The testing for complete blood count, bleeding and coagulation time shall only be required for initial licensure, not renewals.

(c) In addition to the examination required by (a) above, the Commissioner at his or her discretion may order such additional examinations of a boxer at any time for the purpose of determining his or her continued fitness and qualification to engage in a boxing contest.

(d) No applicant shall be granted a license unless the physician appointed by the State Athletic Control Board has certified his or her fitness to engage in a boxing contest.

§ 13:46-12A.3 Thorough medical examination defined

(a) A thorough medical examination shall consist of a minimum requirement of:

1. A CT/MRI Brain Scan (without contrast), within the last three years;

2. An electrocardiogram;

3. Ophthalmological dilation;

4. An annual gynecological and breast exams for women;

5. A serum pregnancy test for women;

6. A comprehensive history and physical examination;

7. A complete blood count for bleeding and coagulation time for initial licensure only;

8. A Hepatitis B and C and HIV test conducted no earlier than 180 days prior to participation in each scheduled competition;

9. A urinalysis; and

10. The completion of a Communicable Bodily Fluid Virus High-Risk Questionnaire no earlier than 180 days prior to participation in each scheduled competition. The Questionnaire will be on a form provided by the Board, and will involve questions with regard to behaviors, practices or settings that likely increase one’s possible risk of contracting a communicable bodily fluid virus.

§ 13:46-12A.4 Pre-fight weigh-in examination

(a) All boxers in all bouts shall be given a medical examination by a physician appointed by the Commissioner prior to the start of the bout, both at the weighing-in and in the evening, a short while before the boxing program commences.  All such examinations shall be conducted privately with no other persons present besides the physician and the boxer.  This physical examination shall include as many of the procedures outlined in  13:46-12A.3 as the examining physician may decide are necessary.  In all cases, the examination shall include the administration of a thorough ophthalmological and neurological examination and a urinalysis.  In all cases, the boxer shall present to the physician the results of a test for the HIV virus in accordance with  13:46-12A.5.

(b) The examination shall include a pregnancy test for all female boxers.  Any contestant determined to be pregnant shall not be permitted to box in this State.

(c) No boxer shall be permitted to enter the ring unless the physician appointed by the Commissioner has certified his or her fitness to engage in a boxing contest.  The physician’s decision that a boxer is not fit to engage in a boxing contest shall not be subject to change by any other official.  A boxer may be disqualified for any medical reason.

§ 13:46-12A.5 HIV examination

All boxers in all bouts shall complete an HIV examination. An HIV test shall be completed by every boxer prior to his or her participation in each boxing match. Pre-fight HIV tests shall be administered no earlier than 180 days prior to the boxing match. Any boxer who fails to produce the results of such a test, or who produces a test result showing that the boxer is infected with the HIV virus, shall not be permitted to box in this State. In addition to the negative test result, a Communicable Bodily Fluid Virus High-Risk Questionnaire must be completed no earlier than 180 days prior to participation in each scheduled competition.

§ 13:46-12A.6 Required hepatitis testing and recommended vaccinations

Hepatitis B and C testing shall be completed by all boxers prior to his or her participation in each boxing match. Pre-fight Hepatitis B and C testing shall be administered no earlier than 180 days prior to the scheduled boxing match. Any boxer who fails to produce a negative test result shall not be permitted to box in this State. In addition to the negative test result, a Communicable Bodily Fluid Virus High-Risk Questionnaire must be completed no earlier than 180 days prior to participation in each scheduled competition. Hepatitis vaccinations, as opposed to testing, are recommended for all boxers but are not mandatory.

§ 13:46-12A.7 Usage of drugs

(a) The use of any drug, narcotic, stimulant, depressant, or analgesic of any description, or alcohol substance, by a boxer either before or during a match, shall result in the immediate disqualification of the boxer from the match and disciplinary action in accordance with  13:46-12A.9.

(b) A boxer shall submit to any pre-fight or post-fight urinalysis or other laboratory procedure ordered by the physician appointed by the Commissioner to detect the presence of any drug.  Refusal to submit to such testing shall result in the immediate disqualification of the boxer from the match and an indefinite suspension from boxing.

§ 13:46-12A.8 Urinalysis

(a) All boxers in all bouts shall complete a pre-fight urinalysis exam to detect the presence of any drug.

(b) In addition to the mandatory pre-fight analysis, the Commissioner may, at his or her discretion, decide to test for the presence of performance enhancing drugs and thereby require additional urine specimens to be produced at any time after the completion of the bout.

(c) Collection of specimens for urinalysis testing shall be conducted by a Commission official.  Refusal to submit to such testing shall result in the immediate disqualification of the boxer from the match and an indefinite suspension from boxing.

§ 13:46-12A.9 Penalties for drug use

(a) Any boxer who tests positive for drug use shall be penalized as follows:

1. First offense: 90 days’ suspension;

2. Second offense: 180 days’ suspension, and mandatory enrollment in a supervisory treatment program approved by the State Commission; and

3. Third offense: Two years’ suspension without appeal.

§ 13:46-12A.10 Post-fight medical examination

(a) All boxers in all bouts shall be given a physical examination by a physician appointed by the Commissioner immediately following the bout.  This physical examination shall include as many of the procedures outlined in  13:46-12A.3 as the examining physician may decide are necessary.  In all cases, the examination shall include the administration of a thorough ophthalmological and neurological examination.

(b) Any boxer refusing to submit to a post-fight medical examination shall be immediately suspended for an indefinite period

§ 13:46-12A.11 Post-knockout suspension

Any boxer who is knocked out in a boxing match shall be suspended from boxing for a minimum 60-day period.  The knocked-out boxer shall not be permitted to participate in a bout until a thorough medical examination is completed and submitted, as prescribed by the ringside physician.

§ 13:46-12A.12 Post-technical knockout suspension

Any boxer who is technically knocked out in a boxing match shall be suspended for a minimum 30-day period.  At the time of the knockout, a Commission physician shall make a determination of whether or not any additional testing is required to enter the ring again.  The knocked out boxer shall not be permitted to participate in a bout until he or she has completed and submitted any such medical examinations prescribed by a Commission physician.

§ 13:46-12A.13 Post-knockout neurological examination

Any boxer who is knocked out or technically knocked out in a boxing match must complete and submit the results of a thorough neurological examination.

§ 13:46-12A.14 Use of disposable hygienic gloves

(a) The Commissioner shall provide, at each professional boxing show, an adequate supply of latex, disposable hygienic laboratory gloves of a type approved by the Commissioner, to be worn by seconds, referees, ringside physicians and inspectors while involved with the boxing show.

(b) The Commissioner shall provide, during the medical examination phase of the weigh-in, an adequate supply of latex, disposable hygienic laboratory gloves to be worn by ringside physicians and inspectors.

(c) No boxing referee shall be permitted to enter the ring unless the referee is wearing the hygienic gloves specified in (a) above.

(d) No second shall be permitted to work in that capacity during a boxing show unless the second is wearing the hygienic gloves specified in (a) above.

(e) No ringside physician shall be permitted to examine or medically treat boxer during a boxing show unless the ringside physician is wearing the hygienic gloves specified in (b) above.  Exceptions shall be permitted if the treatment is considered an emergency, or the nature of treatment or examination makes the wearing of hygienic gloves impractical during the procedure.

(f) No inspector shall be permitted to perform his or her assigned duties during a boxing show, unless the inspector is wearing the hygienic gloves specified in (b) above, except as the Commissioner in his or her discretion may authorize for inspectors on certain assignments.  At each professional boxing show, an adequate supply of disposable hygienic laboratory gloves of a type approved by the Commissioner shall be worn during the entire contest by seconds, referees, ringside physicians, and inspectors working the event.

§ 13:46-12A.15 Medical training required by referees

All referees shall attend a minimum of two medical training seminars each year.  These medical training seminars must be conducted or approved by any state boxing commission or any recognized boxing organization, such as a sanctioning body.  Nationally recognized boxing organizations include, but are not limited to, the World Boxing Council, the North American Boxing Federation and the United States Boxing Association.

§ 13:46-12A.16 Presence of an ambulance

An ambulance shall be present at all professional boxing events, from the commencement of the first bout, throughout the duration of the event, and until the last fighter leaves the arena.  No boxing event shall be allowed to continue if an ambulance is utilized to transport a previous boxer to a medical facility, until another ambulance is available and present at the event.

§ 13:46-12A.17 Presence of emergency medical technicians

There shall be at least two Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) present at all professional boxing events, from the commencement of the first bout, throughout the duration of the event, and until the last fighter leaves the arena.  No boxing event shall be allowed to continue if an EMT leaves the arena to transport a previous boxer to a medical facility, until an EMT replacement is available and present at the event.

(b) All mixed martial arts events shall be subject to the additional health and safety requirements of 13:46-12B.

SUBCHAPTER 12B. ADDITIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY RULES

§ 13:46-12B.1 Use of Monsel’s solution prohibited

The application of Monsel’s solution, or any of its derivatives or any similar drug or compound, on the body of a boxer before a fight is prohibited.

§ 13:46-12B.2 Duties of ringside physician

(a) Ringside physicians shall be appointed by the Commissioner.  No boxing bout or wrestling exhibition may commence or proceed unless the ringside physician is present and seated at ringside.

(b) The ringside physician shall terminate any boxing bout if in the opinion of such physician any contestant has received severe punishment or is in danger of serious physical injury.  In the event of any serious injury, the ringside physician shall immediately render any emergency treatment necessary, order further treatment or hospitalization if required, and fully report the entire matter to the Commissioner within 24 hours and subsequently thereafter, if necessary.  The ringside physician may also require that the injured boxer and his or her manager remain in the ring or on the premises or report to a hospital after the contest for such period of time as such physician deems advisable.  Any boxer, manager or second refusing to comply with the ringside physician’s orders regarding hospitalization may be suspended by the Commissioner in the absence of good cause shown to the contrary.

(c) The ringside physician shall not enter the ring during the progress of a bout unless expressly requested to do so by the referee, after the referee has ordered punching to stop and has separated the contestants.  The ringside physician may enter the ring between the rounds of a boxing match.  The ringside physician shall have the authority, after examining a boxer, to terminate any boxing bout to prevent severe punishment or serious physical injury to a contestant.

(d) The Commissioner shall assign a minimum of two ringside physicians to each boxing program.

§ 13:46-12B.3 Mandatory medical examinations of contestant losing six consecutive fights; inactivity for one year

(a) Any contestant who has lost six consecutive fights shall be automatically suspended from boxing.  The boxer shall not be reinstated until he or she has submitted to a medical examination, of the type specified by  13:46-12A.3, conducted by a physician appointed by the Commissioner.

(b) Any boxer who has not been active for one year or more shall be suspended from boxing until such time that he or she has submitted to a medical examination of the type specified by  13:46-12A.3, conducted by a physician appointed by the Commissioner.

§ 13:46-12B.4 Medical examination of judges and referees

(a) Annual medical examinations shall be given to all licensed judges and referees by a physician approved by the Commission and such examinations shall be of the same type and thoroughness as specified by  13:46-12A.3.

(b) All referees must also submit to a pre-fight medical examination, by a physician appointed by the Commissioner on the day of the bout, of the type specified by  13:46-12A.4.

(c) No referee shall be permitted to enter the ring unless the physician appointed by the Commissioner has certified the referee’s fitness to perform his or her duties during the boxing contest.

§ 13:46-12B.5 Inability to perform contract due to injury or illness

(a) Whenever a licensed boxer considers himself or herself unable by reason of injury or illness to participate in a bout for which he or she is under contract, the boxer shall immediately notify the Commissioner of this fact and, before entering the ring again, the boxer shall submit to a medical examination performed by a physician appointed by the Commissioner of the type specified by  13:46-12A.3.

(b) In the event that a boxer is treated for any serious injury or disabling illness, or has been hospitalized, by his or her personal physician for any reason, the boxer or his or her manager shall immediately notify the Commissioner, who shall refer the matter to a physician appointed by the Commissioner for review.  The boxer, thereafter, shall submit to such medical examination as may be ordered in the discretion of the physician appointed by the Commissioner before engaging in any boxing contest.

(c) Any boxer or manager failing to immediately report any illness or injury to the Commissioner as required by (a) and (b) above shall be immediately suspended for an indefinite period.

§ 13:46-12B.6 Medical reports

(a) The physician appointed by the Commissioner shall make a detailed written record of each and every medical examination performed by him or her under this subchapter and 13:46-12A, on forms provided by the Commissioner or on such other forms as may be necessary.  The original of all such records shall be filed with the Commissioner within 24 hours of each such examination.

(b) The Commissioner shall provide copies of all medical records pertaining to an individual boxer to the physician appointed by the Commissioner who is assigned to that boxer’s next bout, at least one day in advance of said bout.  No boxer shall be permitted to engage in a boxing contest unless the physician appointed by the Commissioner who is assigned to that contest has in his or her possession the boxer’s complete medical history prior to the pre-fight examination.

(c) Physicians appointed by the Commissioner shall fill out and return to the Commissioner immediately after a boxing show a printed injury insurance form, reporting serious injuries.

§ 13:46-12B.7 Suspension notices

(a) The Commissioner shall maintain a current listing of all boxers who are under suspension in this State and in any other boxing jurisdiction.  The Commissioner shall provide a copy of the suspension list to each attending physician at each boxing contest conducted in this State and shall promptly transmit a current copy of the suspension list to every other boxing jurisdiction.  Under no circumstances shall a boxer on the suspension list participate in a boxing contest.

(b) The Commissioner, upon placing a boxer on the suspension list, shall immediately mail a written suspension notice to the boxer and his or her licensed manager at their last known addresses, specifying the nature of the suspension, the reason therefor, and the length of the suspension, where known.

(c) Any boxer who participates in a boxing contest during the period of his or her suspension shall have his or her license revoked.  Any licensed manager of a boxer on the suspension list who participates in a boxing contest shall have his or her license revoked.  Any licensed promoter of a boxing show in which a boxer on the suspension list participates shall have his or her license revoked.

§ 13:46-12B.8 Compensation for physicians

(a) The compensation to physicians shall be paid by the promoter conducting the show and shall be on the following basis:

1. Each physician assigned by the Commissioner to perform duties at the pre-fight weigh-in at a boxing show shall receive a fee of $ 100.00.

2. Each physician assigned by the Commissioner to perform ringside duties at boxing or wrestling show shall receive a fee of $ 200.00.

(b) The compensation schedule set forth in (a) above shall not apply in a sanctioned championship boxing bout.  The Commissioner shall set the compensation to be paid to physicians assigned to perform pre-fight or ringside duties at sanctioned championship boxing bouts.  In making this determination, the Commissioner may consider any determinations, standards or recommendations made by a nationally recognized boxing association whose voting membership is composed of representatives of governmental agencies regulating boxing.  A nationally-recognized boxing association shall include, but not be limited to, the World Boxing Council, the North American Boxing Federation and the United States Boxing Association.  Nevertheless, the Commissioner shall retain full authority to set the compensation schedule for physicians in championship boxing bouts irrespective of a determination or a recommendation by such an association.

§ 13:46-12B.9 60-day rest period for boxers leaving in-patient drug rehabilitation facility

No boxer shall be permitted to enter the ring for a boxing contest in this State if he or she has left or been discharged from an in-patient or residential drug or alcohol rehabilitation facility or program within the 60-day period preceding the contest. Any boxer who competes, or any promoter, manager, or second who knowingly allows a boxer to compete within 60 days of the boxer leaving or being discharged from an in-patient or residential drug or alcohol rehabilitation program or facility shall be subject to discipline by the Commissioner.

(c) All mixed martial arts events shall be subject to the emergency medical facilities and equipment requirements of  13:46-2.8.

§ 13:46-2.8 Emergency medical facilities and equipment

All promoters must provide medical information, facilities and equipment, including but not limited to a stretcher and emergency oxygen, adequate for emergency occasions, and an ambulance for each boxing show, and all such medical facilities and equipment must be approved in advance by the Commissioner.

(d) All mixed martial arts events shall be subject to the insurance requirements of 13:46-14.

SUBCHAPTER 14. INSURANCE FOR BOXERS

§ 13:46-14.1 Carried by promoter

Licensed boxing promoters must carry accident insurance covering all professional boxers competing in their clubs.

§ 13:46-14.2 Premium payment

(a) Each licensed promoter shall be required to submit a full premium payment for boxer’s insurance coverage at the same time that club contracts are filed, five days prior to a show, with the State Athletic Commission.

(b) Payment by check for the premium is to be made out in the name of the insurance company supplied by the Commissioner.

§ 13:46-14.3 Coverage

(a) Insurance will cover professional boxers for medical, surgical and hospital care of at least $ 20,000.

(b) In the event of accidental death, no less than $ 50,000 will be paid to the estate of the deceased.

§ 13:46-14.4 Cost of insurance

The cost of insurance is to be divided equally between the promoter and the boxers appearing in a final bout and semi-final bout or bouts of equal importance and of comparable compensation.  This schedule is subject to change at the discretion of the Commissioner.

§ 13:46-14.5 Compliance

No professional boxing show shall be approved in New Jersey unless the accident insurance plan is met with the fullest compliance.

§ 13:46-24B.5 Weighing of mixed martial artists

Weighing of all mixed martial artists shall be conducted in accordance with the requirements for professional boxers of  13:46-1A.3.

§ 13:46-1A.3 Weighing of boxers

(a) Weighing of all boxers for all shows must take place not later than one o’clock on the day of the show in which said boxers are to take part.

(b) Weights must be determined by a representative of the Commissioner with the matchmaker concerned present.

(c) Opponents should be weighed in the presence of each other.

(d) Members of the press, in addition to the responsible handlers of the boxers, shall be permitted to attend the weighing of principals.

(e) All weights stripped.

(f) No boxer shall be permitted to lose more than one percent of his body weight on the day of the boxing contest in an attempt to make the weight required by his boxing contract and by  13:46-1A.3.